Month: February 2017

Family Linkages to Alcohol Use in College Students

Michael Fendrich, PhD
Michael Fendrich, PhD
Associate Dean for Research

A family history of alcoholism has been found associated with problematic alcohol use among college students, but less research has examined the effects of family history density of substance use problems in this population. This study examined the prevalence of first and second degree biological relatives’ substance use problems and its associations with heavy alcohol use, negative alcohol consequences, and alcohol use disorder in a college sample. The study was analyzed and authored by doctoral student Gregory Powers. Dr. Michael Fendrich and his team from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee generated the data. They concluded that “family history density of substance use problems may play a role in experiencing negative alcohol consequences and in having an alcohol use disorder among undergraduate college students and may be an important risk factor to assess by college health professionals”.

Family history density of substance use problems among undergraduate college students: Associations with heavy alcohol use and alcohol use disorder in Addictive Behaviors 71 (2017) 1-6.

Dr. Garran’s 2nd Edition, Racism in the US Published

Dr. Ann-Marie Garran
Ann Marie Garran, PhD, Associate Professor and MSW Program Director

The second edition of Racism in the United States – Implications for the Helping Professions (Springer) by Joshua Miller, PhD and Ann Marie Garran, PhDRacism in the US was just published. This comprehensive text thoroughly reviews the theories and history of racism, the sociology of and the psychology of racism, intergroup relations and intergroup conflict, and how racism is manifested institutionally, between groups, and between people, providing a unique view of the connections between these multiple perspectives.

This is an ideal text for advanced courses on racism, oppression, diversity, prejudice and discrimination, or racism and professional practice, this book also appeals to helping professionals (social workers, psychologists, counselors, and nurses) who need to understand racism to better serve their clients.

 

Dr. Caitlin Elsaesser Receives SFF in Spring 2017

UConn Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR) has announced the recipients of the Spring 2017 Scholarship   Facilitation Fund (SFF) Awards. Dr. Caitlin Elsaesser was awarded funds to conduct research on “Advancing Knowledge of the Consequences of Youth Violence Exposure”. The SFF program offers support to faculty research, scholarly activities, creative works, and interdisciplinary initiatives. These competitive awards provide up to $2,000 to assist faculty in the initiation, completion, or advancement of these projects. Thirty-one faculty received awards for the spring 2017 semester.

Dr. Elsaesser’s study will focus on better identifying the consequences of adolescent victimization. While it has been established that exposure to various forms of victimization (e.g., child maltreatment, witnessed community violence and family violence) are linked to negative outcomes, youth experience distinct responses to trauma. There is a limited understanding of why victimization results in particular outcomes, in part because longitudinal data on multiple forms of violence is difficult to collect. Her study will use LONGSCAN dataset, and innovative dataset that contains rich data on multiple forms of violence over adolescence. The study will explore three research questions: 1) How does an adolescent’s relationship to the victim of witnessed violence influence outcomes? 2)  How does early childhood maltreatment influence adolescent response to witnessed violence? and 3) Are particular family and school protective factors more salient for preventing adverse adolescent outcomes in response to particular forms of victimization?

Caitlin Elsaesser
Caitlin Elsaesser, Ph.D.

Dr. Elsaesser Recipient of Research Funding

Caitlin Elsaesser

UConn Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR) has announced the recipients of the Spring 2017 Scholarship Facilitation Fund (SFF) Awards. Dr. Caitlin Elsaesser was awarded funds to conduct research on “Advancing Knowledge of the Consequences of Youth Violence Exposure”. The SFF program offers support to faculty research, scholarly activities, creative works, and interdisciplinary initiatives. These competitive awards provide up to $2,000 to assist faculty in the initiation, completion, or advancement of these projects. Thirty-one faculty received awards for the spring 2017 semester.

Caitlin Elsaesser faculty profile