Month: October 2021

Heart Path Therapy® for Therapists

Debra Franklin, LCSW

Register for CE programs now

Wednesday, November 17, 2021
9 am – 12 pm
3 CECs

$60 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$75 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

Heart Path Therapy® for Therapists combines powerful healing approaches from ancient spiritual wisdom combined with guided imagery, Family Constellations, inner child work, sound healing, and energy psychology. There are many wonderful psychological and spiritual healing techniques, but until you heal your own wounds in order to really free your heart, mind, and intuition, those techniques will not be fully effective. As you transform, you empower love, understanding, intuition, and compassion – the most important ingredients to healing. Integrate those with spiritual, sound, and imaginative and energy-oriented approaches, and you will discover your true therapeutic gifts. You can learn to see and feel clients’ “wounds” even before they talk about them and intuitively guide them through a life changing journey once you have traversed your own.

This transformational webinar will take you on an inner journey to experiencing life in a new way. Ms. Franklin will provide a “practitioners introduction” to Heart Path Therapy® to help you significantly on your healing path and inspire your creative gifts as a therapist. Some of what you experience you can begin to apply with your clients.

This webinar will enable you to apply wisdom from sacred traditions whether offering online or in person services, including:

  • the power of an altar, clearing and blessing your space and your clients’, prayer and intention, and the use of sound
  • brief reference to the use of chakras (energy centers in body)
  • ways to increase and apply your intuition, including “feeling” energy
  • explore the roots of emotional struggles, via the inner child and ancestral wounds (the latter from concepts from Family Constellations by Bert Hellinger) through an experiential guided meditation
  • learn about the available options for more in-depth training in Heart Path Therapy® for Therapists

Why the DSM 5 Doesn’t Acknowledge Sensory Integration Symptom and How that Harms All of Our Clients

Register for CE programs nowRuth Pearlman, LISCW

Wednesday, November 10, 2021
10 am – 12 pm
2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is a condition where a person has difficulties regulating their senses within their environment. These are our clients who can experience the world as being “too loud” or “too intense”. They can experience the world as being so sensory over-whelming that their bodies go into a defensive “fight, flight or freeze” stance. For many people with SPD, their constant need to re-regulate their senses to adapt to the stimuli around them, creates symptoms of distractibility, irritability, anxiety, and depression.

So where is SPD in the DSM-5? It isn’t. Although more than half of all the diagnostic criteria of disorders in the DSM-5 describe symptoms of SPD, the APA refuses to acknowledge SPD as a disorder. Therefore, DSM-5 conditions such as ADHD, PTSD, Tourette’s, ASD, ODD, the Anxiety Disorders as well as Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, are never understood or treated through the lens of sensory integration. Yet all of the above disorders are, in large part, sensory-based disorders. Imagine trying to treat a client with ASD or PTSD and not teaching the client about their sensory system reactions?

In this interactive webinar, participants will:

  • Explore the long-delayed need to incorporate sensory integration issues into our working knowledge of the DSM-5
  • Recognize that negative behaviors of are better de-escalated when sensory overload can be quieted (calmed down), similar to “sensory rooms” and “sensory placed” used in schools
  • Consider the clinical cost of these misinterpretations for both children and adults

Understanding Military Culture: Implementation in Treatment

This webinar provides 2 hours of content on practice with Veterans.

Christopher Morse, MSW,  Readjustment Counselor, Providence Vet CenterRegister for CE programs button

Thursday, November 11, 2021
10 am – 12 pm
2 CECs

$40 – UConn SSW Alumni and Current Field Instructors
$50 – All Others

Webinar link will be emailed when your registration is complete.

While the U.S. is seeing increased attention paid to the mental health, substance abuse, and suicide issues within the military and veteran communities, there is also increased concern about our nation’s capacity to provide the services needed. More and more veterans are obtaining mental health care in the civilian sector, but frequently community clinicians have a limited understanding of military and veteran culture.  To assist in developing a therapeutic rapport with veterans and service members, trainer Chris Morse MSW, has drawn on his own military and clinical experience to develop this webinar. Chris will provide clinicians with an overview of military culture, norms, and mores and explore how military life and the combat environment may shape the presentation of the client throughout treatment.

This webinar will:

  • provide a brief overview of military culture and cultural components
  • examine how military service may later affect a veteran’s future interactions
  • identify aspects of military culture that may influence the presentation of the client

Dr. Kathryn Libal Co-PI on OVPR Research Excellence Program Award

Dr. Kathryn Libal Co-PI on OVPR Research Excellence Program Award

Dr. Kathryn Libal, Associate Professor and Director of the UConn Human Rights Institute, was named a Co-PI on an Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR) Research Excellence Program (REP) award:

Investigator: Oscar Guerra, Digital Media and Design
Co-PIs: Glenn Tatsuya Mitoma,  Curriculum & Instruction and Human Rights Institute; Kathryn Libal, Human Rights Institute
Project: COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout in Stamford, CT: A Multimedia Archiving Project
Award: $24,999.35

The primary goal of the Research Excellence Program is to provide seed funding to fuel innovative research, scholarship, and creative endeavors with strong potential for:

  • Significant extramural funding from federal and state sponsors, corporations, industry partners, and foundations.
  • Achievements consistent with the highest standards of accomplishment in the discipline.