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Grants

Social Work Cloud

 

Grant Summary Information Funding Source Date of Award Abstract
Bryan, Janelle (PI) Evaluation for the Paternal PreNatal Early Attachment Eastern Connecticut Health Network 4/14/2016

Evaluation for the Paternal PreNatal Early Attachment

Douglas G. Edwards of Real Dads Forever plans to conduct one Real Dads Forever Prenatal Early Attachment Program (RDFPEAP) workshop for up to 12 couples.  The women are clients of the Eastern Connecticut Health Network (ECHN) Family Development Center and Family Birthing Center at Manchester Memorial Hospital and will be pregnant at the time of enrollment.  Janelle Bryan, Ph.D. candidate and Brenda Kurz will serve as PIs.  They have been asked to evaluate RDFPEAP.  The objective is to evaluate the RDFPEAP such that the program and evaluation instruments can be further refined and pilot data collected as a basis for future grant applications, possible publications, and presentations, and as evidence base for the program.

Cordero, Antonia (PI) Dr. Robin Spath, (Co-PI) The Connecticut Partnership for Child Welfare Excellence National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI) 1/1/2015

The Connecticut Partnership for Child Welfare Excellence

The CT Partnership offers the opportunity for the UConn SSW and the CT Department of Children and Families to collaborate, with the goal of refining and strengthening foundational and child welfare-related curricula content to enhance the competency levels of the CT Partnership trainees and other students alike. In addition, it provides the opportunity to collaborate on mutual objectives of addressing knowledge, skills, abilities and diversity of the public child welfare workforce by targeting recruitment for masters level trainees from within populations under-represented (Hispanic, male, linguistically diverse) in the current DCF welfare workforce; and to increase the pool of masters level, professionally trained social work graduates as one key strategy that can improve the quality of public child welfare practices and outcomes. To date, one cohort of 7 MSW graduates have completed the program and have been hired as child welfare employees. Currently, 8 MSW students have been accepted for the 2015-16 academic year.

Fendrich, Michael (PI) Self-Management Science Center University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee National Institute of Health (NIH) National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) 1/26/2015

Self Management Science Center University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

This is a center grant to develop research expertise in the area of self-management of chronic diseases in community-based studies among nurse faculty members of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Nursing. Dr. Fendrich is the director of the pilot core of this center grant. In this role, he is in charge of serving as a resource for the investigators running pilot studies exploring self-management interventions. In this role, he provides expertise in research design, project execution, and data analysis to the investigators who are PI’s of the pilot studies.

Kurz, Brenda (PI) DRS Performance Improvement Center Connecticut Department of Children and Families (DCF) 7/31/2012

DRS Performance Improvement Center

Performance Improvement Center: The Performance Improvement Center (PIC) supports delivery of high-quality Community Support Services/Family Assessment Response as part of CT Department of Children and Family Services’ (DCF), new Differential Response System (DRS) initiative. Funded by DCF, the PIC directs and performs evaluation and quality improvement activities, including consultation, satisfaction surveys, fidelity ratings and other activities, with DCF and six Community Partner Agencies.

Heller, Nina (PI) Training for OD and Department of Social Services Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS) 6/1/1981

Training for OD and Department of Social Services

The UConn School of Social Work and the Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS) have worked collaboratively for over twenty five years. DSS has an Office of Organizational and Skill Development (OSD) that provides training and organizational development services to DSS and its staff. The OSD staff and the services are part of a formal partnership between the school and DSS. This arrangement insures effectiveness, efficiency, and shared resources that benefit the partners, clients and The State of Connecticut. Education and training for DSS staff and its partners is focused on programs, leadership and professional growth and development. Cultural responsiveness and social justice are fundamental part of training and organizational design services. Graduate students from the School of Social Work are placed as interns in DSS departments.

Heller, Nina (Co-PI) Transitioning Youth At Risk Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 1/1/2015

Transitioning Youth At Risk

This is a new project that will involve improving the curriculum of social work graduate students to help them become more prepared in working with young adults who have SMI and who are at risk. The RD will create a survey to examine how competent and skilled the students feel in working with this population before and after completing the new curriculum and specific field practicums designed for this project.

Lin, Hsiu-Ju (PI) YAS Program Monitoring and Data Management Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) 12/1/2012

YAS Program Monitoring and Data Management

The DMHAS Young Adult Services (YAS) program provides services to adults aged 18-25, most of whom have transitioned from the Department of Children and Families (DCF). Services include behavioral health care, case management, supportive housing, skills training, supportive employment and education, and parenting assistance. All services are voluntary, and program participants vary widely in their engagement, length of stay, and outcomes. This evaluation project will examine existing data to determine which personal, clinical, and program factors are associated with outcomes (i.e., successful program completion, independent housing, employment or education gains, criminal justice involvement and hospitalizations.)

Lin, Hsiu-Ju (PI) DIG Program Evaluation and Analysis Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) 9/30/2013

DIG Program Evaluation and Analysis

The purpose of the project is to provide technical assistance, including data management and data analysis of behavior health performance data utilizing National Outcome Measures (NOMS) for the Evaluation, Quality Management & Improvement (EQMI) Division of the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS). These technical supports will facilitate program monitoring, and program evaluation, and the production of reports to meet DMHAS, State of Connecticut, and Federal requirements.

Lin, Hsiu-Ju (PI) Implementation and Effectiveness of Gun Seizure Laws in Connecticut Duke University New Venture Foundation 6/1/2014

Implementation and Effectiveness of Gun Seizure Laws in Connecticut

Existing evidence suggests that jail diversion programs reduce recidivism and increase engagement in treatment services among participants. It is unknown, however, if and how jail diversion works differently for men and women, given unique, gender-specific needs and risk factors. The study will use quasi-experimental analyses to model gender differences among diversion participants and their non-diverted counterparts in clinical, demographic, and CJ characteristics; use of treatment and support services as part of the diversion program; use of crisis care (psychiatric hospitalizations and emergency department visits); and rates and types of recidivism after initiating diversion. Part 2 of the project will involve focus groups with jail diversion professionals to better understand the key gender-specific risk and protective factors for CJ involvement, diversion program selection and engagement, and outcomes.

Lin, Hsiu-Ju (PI) Gender Differences in Jail Diversion for Adults with co-occurring disorders Duke University National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA) 8/1/2014

Gender Differences in Jail Diversion for Adults with co-occurring disorders

Existing evidence suggests that jail diversion programs reduce recidivism and increase engagement in treatment services among participants. It is unknown, however, if and how jail diversion works differently for men and women, given unique, gender-specific needs and risk factors. The study will use quasi-experimental analyses to model gender differences among diversion participants and their non-diverted counterparts in clinical, demographic, and CJ characteristics; use of treatment and support services as part of the diversion program; use of crisis care (psychiatric hospitalizations and emergency department visits); and rates and types of recidivism after initiating diversion. Part 2 of the project will involve focus groups with jail diversion professionals to better understand the key gender-specific risk and protective factors for CJ involvement, diversion program selection and engagement, and outcomes.

Papallo, Peter MSW (PI) Transitioning Youth At Risk Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 1/1/2015

Transitioning Youth At Risk

This is a new project that will involve improving the curriculum of social work graduate students to help them become more prepared in working with young adults who have SMI and who are at risk. The RD will create a survey to examine how competent and skilled the students feel in working with this population before and after completing the new curriculum and specific field practicums designed for this project.

Ungemack, Jane (PI) Parr, Kathryn (CoPI) Substance Abuse Family Evaluation Recovery and Support (SAFERS) Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Office of Family Assistance (OFA) 10/1/2013

Substance Abuse Family Evaluation Recovery and Support (SAFERS)

SAFERS will provide services to provide a coordinated array of evidence-based practices and services to meet the needs of the substance-abusing parents and their children. At the heart of the SAFERS program is a team of Recovery Specialists who will work directly with parents to assess their and their children’s needs for services related to substance exposed infants, will coordinate access to those services, including substance abuse treatment, parenting skill-building and trauma-informed care, across the multiple agencies involved with these child welfare families, and provide recovery support to the parents and their children to promote child and family well-being. This analysis will evaluate outcomes, well-being and costs.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) Evaluation of Supportive Housing – (ISHF)* Administration of Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) 9/30/2010

Evaluation of Supportive Housing – (ISHF)

This is a 5-year evaluation of an intensive supportive housing model for DCF involved families who are homeless and at risk of homelessness. The Connection, Inc. is providing supportive housing services with the integration of employment services, trauma screening and trauma-informed care. Connecticut will be one of five sites in a national multi-site trial. Connecticut will include a randomized controlled trial and participate in local and state cost-benefit analysis.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) Advanced Supervision & Intervention Support Team Evaluation – ASIST Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) 12/1/2011

Advanced Supervision & Intervention Support Team Evaluation – ASIST

Following a longitudinal interviewing evaluation, this study applies a propensity scoring method to generate a comparable control group to test the effect of the ASIST program, which provides mental health services to persons under criminal justice supervision. Program monitoring is on-going.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) Specialized CIT for Young Adults: Evaluation SCYA Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) 10/1/2013

Specialized CIT for Young Adults Evaluation – SCYA

In order to enhance the capacity of its Crisis Intervention Teams (CITs) to respond to the needs of young adults (YAs) with mental health and co-occurring disorders. Through expert training and consultation, network development and creation of a response capacity, CITs will be able to effectively engage YAs in the most appropriate treatment.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) Safe Schools/Healthy Students Evaluation Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) 10/1/2013

Safe Schools/Healthy Students Evaluation

In this grant funded by SAMHSA, the CT Departments of Mental Health & Addiction Services, Education, and Court Support Services Division will lead the CT Safe Schools/Healthy Students Diffusion Project to create safe and supportive schools and communities statewide. Partnering with three LEAs in Bridgeport, Middletown and New Britain, this project will plan and implement sustainable, comprehensive and culturally competent evidence-based programs for children, adolescents and their families. The evaluation of this project is being conducted by the SSW-DMHAS Research Division.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) DMHAS Research Development Initiative Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) 9/1/2014

DMHAS Research Development Initiative

This service-to-science focus has involved the development, evaluation, and dissemination of innovative services oriented toward addressing important unmet needs of DMHAS clients. In addition to evidence-based practices, the major areas for this collaboration have been creating a recovery-oriented system of care, identifying and redressing health care disparities based on race, ethnicity, and culture through the cultivation of a culturally-responsive system of care, and exploring alternative approaches for high risk populations.

Rodis, Eleni M S (PI) Evaluation of Connecticut’s Critical Time Intervention Plus (CT CTIP) Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 9/30/2014

Evaluation of Connecticut’s Critical Time Intervention Plus (CT CTIP)

The purpose of this project is to provide Critical Time Intervention Plus (CTI+) to chronically homeless participants. CTI+ is composed of 4 components (1) CTI, which offers a structured move to housing through 9 months of transition, try-out, and transfer of care; (2) SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access & Recovery (SOAR), which facilitates applications for disability entitlements; (3) Supported Employment, to connect participants who are able to work with jobs; and (4) Peer Recovery Specialists.

Rodis, Eleni M S (PI) Evaluation of CT STRONG – Seamless Transitions and Recovery Opportunities through Network Growth, Healthy Transitions Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 9/30/2014

Evaluation of CT STRONG – Seamless Transitions and Recovery Opportunities through Network Growth, Healthy Transitions

The CT STRONG (Seamless Transition and Recovery Opportunities through Network Growth) will engage and connect transition age youth and young adults to high-quality behavioral health care. The youth to be served must reside in New London, Milford or Middletown and be at risk for, or have behavioral health disorders.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) Evaluation of FUSE (Frequent Users of Jail Shelter Enhancement) Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) 9/30/2014

Evaluation of FUSE (Frequent Users of Jail Shelter Enhancement)

There are 2 aspects to this project. First, the merging of data between CT DOC and the Homeless Management Information System to identify persons who move between jails and shelters, to target permanent supportive housing resources to them. Secondly, the enhanced supportive housing program is being evaluated through a follow-up study. Funding was received in fall 2010 which increased slots in existing sites and added 2 new program sites, so the evaluation was expanded to include those.

Rodis, Eleni MS (PI) Evaluation of Connecticut’s Critical Time Intervention Plus Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) 9/30/2014

Evaluation of Connecticut’s Critical Time Intervention Plus

There are 2 aspects to this project. First, the merging of data between CT DOC and the Homeless Management Information System to identify persons who move between jails and shelters, to target permanent supportive housing resources to them. Secondly, the enhanced supportive housing program is being evaluated through a follow-up study. Funding was received in fall 2010 which increased slots in existing sites and added 2 new program sites, so the evaluation was expanded to include those.

Smith, Tanya (PI) The Voter Empowerment Campaign: Developing a Model for Schools of Social Work NY Community Trust 1/1/2016

The Voter Empowerment Campaign: Developing a Model for Schools of Social Work

This award will provide support to develop a model for embedding voter education training into MSW classroom curricula and field education. This project will produce online training materials and resources that can be used nationwide in Social Work education programs.

Ulaszek, Wendy (PI) WISE Phase II Nursing Home Transition – Working for Integration, Support and Empowerment Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) 3/31/2012

WISE Phase II Nursing Home Transition – Working for Integration, Support and Empowerment

This study measures the impact of Mental Health Medicaid Waiver, which is used to move people from nursing homes back into the community with supportive services. Dr. Ulaszek presents the WISE LOC-Assessment measure and information gathered by the WISE program staff to the WISE Advisory Council and meets with DMHAS program providers to discuss and analyze current procedures and help programs/organizational systems merge if deemed appropriate to do so in the future.

Ulaszek, Wendy (PI) DOC Smoking Cessation Connecticut Department of Correction (CT DOC) 4/1/2013

DOC Smoking Cessation

This project is designed to implement smoking education, cessation, prevention, and/or relapse prevention interventions at four DOC facilities. This project is designed to address this need by 1) conducting a prevalence study of smoking amongst the offender population and 2) implementing a sustainable program to address both the tobacco withdrawal issues for inmates entering DOC facilities as well as behavioral programming, education, and related mechanisms for reducing the risk of habituation for inmates who are discharging back to their home communities. In order to implement a smoking cessation program within DOC facilities, the RD staff will help DOC to establish new procedures via the use of Local Implementation Teams (LITs) and using a “train the trainer” model (i.e., working directly to educate and train the staff who will be working with inmates both within DOC and in the community).

Wilson, Cristina (PI) Teen Pregnancy Prevention through Responsible Fathering: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Father Works Program Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) Administration for Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) 6/1/2013

Teen Pregnancy Prevention through Responsible Fathering: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Father Works Program

This six-year randomized controlled community-based trial is designed to reduce repeat fatherhood by providing motivation, opportunities, and skills needed to change risk behavior. FatherWorks services include parenting education and individualized case management, behavioral health services, and educational and vocational support. As the independent evaluator, the TRIPP Center, in partnership with the UConn School of Social Work, is conducting ongoing process and outcome evaluation to assess six primary outcomes, including changes in paternal identity, changes in paternal caregiving behavior, achievement of education and training goals, achievement of employment goals, improved behavioral intentions for contraceptive use, and reductions in risky sexual behavior. The evaluation also assesses secondary outcomes including self-reported subsequent conceptions/fathering, changes in parenting skills knowledge, changes in job readiness and skills, and improvements in reproductive and contraceptive use knowledge. The evaluation team will conduct a multilevel longitudinal analysis of data collected at five points in time (enrollment, 15 weeks, 8 months, 12 months, and 16 months). The Village for Families and Children Inc. has partnered with UConn Health Center and faculty from the UConn School of Social Work (Dr. Cristina Wilson, co-PI) to design and evaluate this randomized control trial of their innovative programming. Total funding is approximate $5.2 million over 6 years, with UConn Health Center/UConn receiving approximately $1.5 million over 6 years to conduct the evaluation. The target population is primarily Latino and Black American males ages 15-24 who have fathered a child with a female under the age of 21. Here is the public service announcement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3poNKzpBgA

Parr, Kathryn (PI) Family Stability Project Social Finance/University of Connecticut Health Center 1/27/2017

Family Stability Project Evaluation

This is a mixed methods evaluation of the implementation and outcomes of CT’s Two Generational Initiative. ‘Two-Gen’ focuses on providing serving adults and children together in the development of human capital. The project consists of five place-based initiatives and a statewide systems change initiative.

Parr, Kathryn (PI) CT Generation Initiative Evaluation Connecticut Association for Human Services 7/11/2017

Generation Initiative Evaluation

This is a mixed methods evaluation of the implementation and outcomes of CT’s Two Generational Initiative.  ‘Two-Gen’ focuses on providing serving adults and children together in the development of human capital. The project consists of five place-based initiatives and a statewide systems change initiative.

Fendrich, Michael (PI) MAT – PDOA DHHS/SAMHSA/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration/CT Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services 10/19/2016

MAT PDOA

This is an evaluation of a program to expand the availability of medication assisted treatment for prescription drug and opioid addiction. The evaluation, carried out jointly with Eleni Rodis and the DMHAS Research Division staff will look at client outcomes and assess the implementation process across four sites within Connecticut:  Bristol,  New Britain, Torrington, and Willimantic.

Parr, Kathryn (PI) Recovery Specialist Volunteer Program (RSVP) CT Department of Children and Families/University of Connecticut Health Center 11/11/2016

Recovery Specialist Volunteer Program (RSVP)

This is an evaluation of a program for parents who have children affected by orders of temporary custody related to parental substance abuse.

Ulaszek, Wendy (PI) Evaluating Early Access to Medicaid as a Reentry Strategy DOJ/National Institute of Justice/Urban Institute 6/26/2017
Ulaszek, Wendy (PI) WISE Evaluation – Phase II CT Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services 4/12/2012
Papallo, Peter (PI) Transitioning Youth at Risk DHHS/HRSA/Bureau of Health Professions 10/28/2014

Transitioning Youth at Risk

The Transitioning Youth at Risk program is designed for second year and advanced standing casework and group students, and offers a $10,000 stipend. Students’ placement sites are in the Young Adult Services programs at the Department of Mental Health and Addictions Services offices, and DHMAS funded non-profit agencies. The clientele served are those 18-26 year olds with significant mental illnesses and dual diagnoses. This is a grant funded program, made possible by the Health Resources and Services Administration. Acceptance into the program and acceptance of the stipend may impact the student’s overall financial aid package. Participants are enrolled in a two semester, 3-credit seminar at the school. They attend inter-professional training’s focused on this population. Participants will provide a full range of social work services to this population: young adults who have aged out of DCF care, have had multiple out of home placements, have significant mental health and substance use diagnoses.

Kurz, Brenda (PI) DRS Performance Improvement Center DHHS/ACF/Administration for Children and Families/CT Department of Children and Families 10/29/2014

DRS Performance Improvement Center

The UConn School of Social Work Performance Improvement Center (PIC) provides quality assurance and evaluative services to the CT Department of Children and Families for its differential response system (DRS).DRS is a Child Protective Services system reform that enables such systems to respond deferentially to reports of child abuse and neglect. Typically, DRS has two tracks, traditional Investigation/Intake and Family Assessment Response (FAR) which is for families with a low-moderate safety risk. Over the past twenty years, more than two-thirds of all states implemented or initiated a differential response system (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2014). In Connecticut, FAR, and more specifically the Community Supports for Families (CSF) program which is offered by DCF contracted Community Partner Agencies (CPA), offers families that meet certain criteria,voluntary, family-driven, and individualized services. The purpose of CSF is to promote child and family well-being, build and strengthen natural and community-based supports, and provide linkages to community services. To this end, CSF incorporates family engagement approaches in its work. PIC performs secondary data analysis of the administrative data collected by DCF and the CPAs. As noted, the UConn Performance Improvement Center (PIC) works with DCF and the CPAs to provide continuous quality improvement and evaluation services.

Fendrich, Michael (PI) Impact of Mobile Crisis Services on Rates of Emergency Department Utilization Among Children Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut 3/3/2017

Impact of Mobile Crisis Services on Rates of Emergency Department Utilization Among Children

This is an evaluation of the impact of an emergency mobile psychiatric service (EMPS) intervention targeted to Connecticut youth with behavioral health issues.  Working with merged data from multiple sources, this study will investigate whether use of these services results in a decreased likelihood of subsequent emergency department services for behavioral health issues.  We will also examine how the characteristics of individuals served and the services provided affect subsequent emergency department and residential behavioral health services use.  Focus groups with providers will also be carried to better understand the nature of the EMPS services.

Rodis, Eleni (PI) Gambling Services Evaluation CT Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services 12/8/2015

Gambling Services Evaluation

The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of gambling and associated behaviors and characteristics within the Connecticut Department of Correction population. Existing literature indicates that gambling problems can lead to criminal activity and can predict criminal recidivism. In addition, problem gambling has been noted as being associated with other behavioral problems such as psychiatric and substance use disorders. However, there is very limited data on this topic that is specific to Connecticut’s population and to any criminal justice populations in the US. This study involves conducting gambling prevalence surveys at six DOC facilities. These facilities will provide a representative sampling of different DOC subpopulations, including those who are pre-trial, those who are pre-release after long sentences, men, women, and different geographic areas in the state. In addition to identifying the level of gambling behaviors, additional analyses will be conducted in order to explore the level of association between behavioral health issues and gambling activities, types of gambling most common in the DOC population, subgroup differences, barriers and facilitators to stopping problem gambling, and the level of interest in quitting gambling among the incarcerated population.

Medina, Catherine(PI)  BHWET Competition Health Resources and Services Administration 9/30/2017

BHWET Competition

The University of Connecticut, School of Social Work (UConn SSW) with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) for the Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) Program. The proposed Integrating Care Across the Lifespan (ICAL) program will recruit, train, place and provide stipends for 20 master’s-level students each year in field assignments. The assignments will focus on behavioral health practice for under-served populations and regions of the state—those with limited access to integrated health. The purpose of this effort is to increase the number of professionals entering the behavioral health field who have enhanced knowledge of and capacity to provide services in an integrated care setting. At the same time, the program will build the ability of provider sites in under-served communities to offer quality integrated care services.

Wagner, Julie (Co-PI) Berthold, Megan (Co-PI) Buckely, Thomas (Co-PI) Remote PEER LEARNING for US-CAMBODIA COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS MANAGING DIABETES (PLUS CamboDIA)

 

University of Connecticut Health Research Excellence Program (REP-UCH)  5/23/2017

Remote PEER LEARNING for US-CAMBODIA COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS MANAGING DIABETES (PLUS CamboDIA)

Cambodia is experiencing a diabetes epidemic yet many people diagnosed with diabetes do not present for treatment, even when available and affordable, due to cultural beliefs. Cambodia also faces a critical shortage of healthcare workers. In response, Cambodia has developed a national system of community health workers called Village Health Support Guides (Guides). Guides are eager to address diabetes, yet they lack knowledge, training, and support. In the US, Cambodian-Americans have developed bilingual tools and a Community Health Worker (CHW) workforce to address diabetes here. Following principles of peer learning theory, over six months, 3 US-based, bilingual CHWs will provide training and ongoing support to 6 Cambodian Guides through telehealth using phablets (phone+electronic tablet). CHWs will train Guides on our validated, bilingual Eat, Walk, Sleep diabetes curriculum. The Cambodian Guides, in turn, will deliver the curriculum and provide routine follow-up to 60 diabetic villagers who are not currently engaged in treatment to promote treatment initiation at Cambodian Diabetes Association clinics and medication adherence. At baseline and again at six-months post intervention, we will measure CHW, Guide, and patient outcomes. We aim to: (1) test the acceptability, feasibility, and cost of peer-to-peer training with telehealth; (2) demonstrate that the intervention improves appropriate healthcare utilization for patients with type 2 diabetes; and (3) determine whether the intervention improves diabetes self-management and glycemic control. Our high-tech (telehealth), human-touch (Guides/CHWs) approach is highly innovative. Our team has a history of successful collaborations and we received a competitive score on an R21 for PAR-16-292 “Mobile Health: Technology and Outcomes in Low and Middle Income Countries” but were not funded. Preliminary data would increase the likelihood of a successful resubmission and would also position us to respond to PAR-16-052, “Global Noncommunicable Diseases and Injury Across the Lifespan”. Such trials may, in turn, lead to dissemination.

Elsaesser, Caitlin (PI) Understanding Cyberbanging Among Youth Living in Violent Neighborhoods Research Excellence Program

Understanding Cyberbanging Among Youth Living in Violent Neighborhoods

Violence in impoverished urban areas is nothing new, but social media is changing the dynamic. Youth living in urban areas report that taunts on social media from rival gang members commonly result in violence, such as in physical beatings, in retaliation. Concurrently, evidence suggests that youth are differentially susceptible to engaging in aggressive stressful online interactions. Given that homicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents, identifying the role of social media in violence is a critical public health issue, yet little work has examined the role of social media in online aggression among youth living in areas with high rates of violence. This study will fill a key gap by developing a measure that captures the experience of aggressive stressful online behavior, based on data collected from focus groups, and piloted with a sample of adolescents from urban areas. Additionally, this study will document youths’ strategies for de-escalation with such interactions. This knowledge will provide key steps forward in prevention by identifying the conditions that increase the likelihood of these interactions. The creation of this measure will further support future research that will develop models for predicting when aggressive communication online leads to offline violence and will have clinical utility for screening youth at risk for offline violence. Our specific aims are as follows: 1) To develop a measure that accurately reflects and assesses aggressive online interactions that youth identify as most likely to lead to offline violence; 2) To identify strategies youth use to de-escalate aggressive online interactions and therefore avoid violence; 3) To examine the psychometric properties of the preliminary measure; and 4) To conduct a preliminary assessment of the utility of the measure through identifying the prevalence and correlates of aggressive stressful online interactions.